News from around the web

Here are some news stories pertaining to AFVs from the last week.  Click on the headline to read the full article.

IHS Jane’s: British Army ditches Warthog armored vehicle

1650413_-_mainThe British Army has retired is ST Kinetics Warthog articulated tracked armored vehicles from service, IHS Jane’s can reveal.

In total, 115 Warthogs (an improved version of the ST Kinetics Bronco) were purchased by the United Kingdom as an urgent operational requirement (UOR) for use in Afghanistan instead of the less-well protected BvS 10 Viking articulated tracked vehicle.


Defense News: Poland Eyes $21B Program To Replace Fighting Vehicles

635936545856285476-DFN-Poland-armored-vehiclesThe Polish government is planning to spend up to 80 billion zloty (US $21 billion) to replace its military’s Soviet-designed BWP-1 and BWP-2 infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) with new tracked vehicles, Deputy Defense Minister Bartosz Kownacki told local news agency PAP.

“This is a major undertaking for the next dozen years which, according to various estimates, will generate a cost of between 20 and 80 billion zloty if we decide to acquire two types of infantry fighting vehicles, lighter and heavier units,” Kownacki said.


IHS Jane’s: USMC receives first upgraded Assault Amphibious Vehicle

aav-outside-5-750xx3264-1836-0-306The US Marine Corps (USMC) in early March received the first of 10 initial redesigned Assault Amphibious Vehicles-Survivability Upgrade (AAV-SU) platforms from contractor SAIC.

AAV-SU is “just one of the paths that the marine corps has chosen to upgrade the capability of the current AAV”, John Garner, USMC programme manager for advanced amphibious assault, told IHS Jane’s on 15 March.

The AAVs have long been due for replacement, but the USMC is slowly fielding a new amphibious tractor capability with its emerging Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (ACV 1.1) programme, so meanwhile the AAV upgrade will commence.


Motley Fool: General Dynamics Tank Rival Wins a Big Contract in Poland

t72-poland_largeWith nearly 600 units in service, the Soviet T-72 main battle tank serves as the backbone of the Polish Army today. There’s just one problem: These tanks, built by Russia and requiring Russian spare parts to maintain them, are currently pointing their guns at Russia — which became an increasingly urgent threat after its 2014 invasion of Poland’s eastern neighbor, Ukraine.

Now, Poland does have some tanks of its own manufacture — more than 230 homegrown PT-91 tanks in various derivations. But in an effort to further integrate itself into NATO’s self-defense forces, Poland’s recently been turning to the West to supply an increasing number of its heavy weapons.


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