Audio: Steven Zaloga on War College Podcast

war collegeThis came out in April, but we just came across it today.  Noted tank expert and author Steven Zaloga discusses the history of tanks on the War College podcast.  This podcast is a nice primer on the topic.  War College is a weekly podcast hosted by Matthew Gault of War Is Boring and produced by Bethel Habte, podcast editor at Reuters.com.

Listen to the podcast here.

Episode description:

War nerds love tanks. The battlefield behemoths drove onto the scene in the early days of World War I, replaced the cavalry and became synonymous with war. But which one is the best?

This week on the show, author Steven Zaloga walks us through the ins and outs of armored vehicles. He explains how the French Renault doesn’t get enough credit, how the Sherman came to dominate Europe and how people always forget about the Russians.

It’s everything you ever wanted to know about tanks but were afraid to ask on War College this week. How have wire guided missiles changed the game? What’s reactive armor and why does it explode? And what, if any, is the point of tanks in low intensity warfare?

 

Forgotten Weapons videos on two unusual Anti-tank Rifles

Over at the Forgotten Weapons youtube channel, host Ian McCollum takes a look at a couple unusual and rare anti-tank rifles.

The first video takes a look at the only surviving prototype of a WWI American .50 cal anti-tank rifle by Winchester.

 

The second video looks at the Model SS41, a Czech bullpup anti-tank rifle adopted by the Waffen SS.

From the Vault: The Turtle Series of Armored Vehicles

From the January-February 1965 issue of ARMOR come this rather intriguing article by the late Robert Icks concerning a proposed series of vehicles called the Turtle Series by the NDRC.  The NDRC (National Defense Research Committee) was set up during WWII to promote and coordinate scientific research related to defense technology.  Some of the most successful programs they helped fund include the Manhattan Project, the DUKW, the proximity fuze and radar technology.  It seems they also proposed a series of tank designs, none of which ever got beyond the mockup stage.  Click on the page images below to read the full article.

Book Alert: Nothing Impossible: Memoirs of a United States Cavalryman In World War 2

A new memoir of a WWII armor veteran has been released.  Nothing Impossible: Memoirs of a United States Cavalryman In World War 2 tells the story of the late Wallace Clement who served in the 804th Tank Destroyer Battalion in Italy.  This is a softcover book of 210 pages.

Publisher’s Description:

Merriam Press World War 2 Memoir Series
First Edition 2017

The late Wallace Clement served in three wars, World War II, Korea and Vietnam. A West Point Cadet, he entered the Army as a 2nd Lt. in 1940, rising to the rank of Major in 1944, serving with the 804th Tank Destroyer Battalion in Italy where late in the war he was captured and ended the war as a POW.

He served in the Korean War, as a Lt. Colonel, and in Vietnam as a Brig. General as assistant division commander of the 23rd Americal Division.

He was awarded every medal that a soldier can receive save for the Medal of Honor.

This is his story, written by him, and edited by a good friend, Sean Heuvel, who as a boy listened to Clement tell his tales of his service.

Photo of the Day: Prom in a Tank

Yes, we know it’s an APC, not a tank, but “Prom in a Tank” is a far catchier headline than “Prom in an APC.”  This photo comes from The Sun which reported that these British teenagers were driven to the Prom in their grandfather’s Saurer 4K 4FA.

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From the Vault: Korea’s Ridge Running Tankers

Twin 50 pictureWhile the Sherman tank is so closely associated with the Second World War, it’s sometimes overlooked that these vehicles also served the US Army in a very different conflict, the Korean War.  This article from the May-June 1953 issue of ARMOR provides an account by a First Lieutenant who recounts how Sherman tank crews in Korea had to acclimate their tactics and vehicles to fighting a static war in mountainous terrain.  One thing we found rather interesting in this article was the mention that one of the Easy Eight Sherman tanks was equipped with twin .50 cal machine guns on the roof and one in the hull replacing the .30 cal machine gun.  A picture of the vehicle with the twin .50 cal guns is included in the article.  If any other photographic evidence of this particular vehicle exists, we would love to see it.

Click on the page images below to view them in full size.

Marines Under Armor: An Interview with Kenneth Estes

Tank and AFV News recently had the opportunity to pose a series of questions to retired Marine Corps Lieutenant Colonel and professor of history Kenneth Estes.  Mr. Estes is the author of several books on tanks and armored warfare, most notably his history of the development and role of AFVs in the USMC, Marines Under Armor.  His other works include (but not limited to) Tanks on the Beaches: A Marine Tanker in the Pacific War (Texas A&M University Military History Series, 85.), A European Anabasis: Western European Volunteers in the German Army and SS, 1940-45, Into the Breach at Pusan: The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade in the Korean War (Campaigns and Commanders Series), Marine Officer’s Guide, 7th Edition and also several Osprey New Vanguard series titles.  Mr. Estes is a Seattle native and holds a doctorate in Modern European History from the University of Maryland.

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You had a long and successful career with the USMC, having held positions such as Company commander, instructor, historian and writer before retiring at the grade of Lieutenant Colonel (full career synopsis available at end of interview).  Describe the beginning of your USMC career.

CPend DelMar Apr70I graduated from the Naval Academy in 1969, took the basic USMC officer course [The Basic School] Aug69-Jan70, attended USMC Tracked Vehicle School, Tank Officer Course Feb-Apr70.  At the USMC Tank Officer Course, Camp Pendleton (1970), I trained on the M48A3, M67A2 and M103A2 tanks.  This included firing the machine guns, 90mm and 120mm tank cannon and the flame projector of the M67A2. Normally each of us in that course would have preferred assignment to the U.S. Army course at Ft Knox, but only one officer per Basic School class was so detailed. However, the truth of the matter was that the USMC course was fully ‘hands on’ and personal training for just 10 tank officer trainees and therefore much more suitable, and I found out months later that lieutenants attending the Armor Officer Basic Course at Ft Knox in those years did not drive the vehicles and several missed gunnery because of range weather conditions. Moreover, the USMC Tracked Vehicle School was located at gorgeous Del Mar Basin on the coast near Oceanside CA, so one could enjoy all the merits of Californication.

You either served or trained on the M48, M60 and M103 US tanks.  What were your impressions of these vehicles?

Well, by the time I came to serve in them, these were vehicles introduced into service in 1955-58, modernized in 1963-64 with most applicable M60 upgrades and once again rebuilt during the Vietnam War. So, they were very familiar to all hands and spares were available in the system. The principal difficulty was that the USMC supply system did not function very well in delivering spare parts to the units and particularly did not draw items well from the item manager [US Army]. Army provisioning of parts was much richer for units and we envied this.

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