Book Review: Hungarian Armored Forces of World War II

A video book review of Hungarian Armored Forces in World War II (Photosniper) by Peter Mujzer, published by Kagero as part of their Photosniper series.

Video Book Review: Tank Wrecks of the Eastern Front 1941-1945

We review the latest in the Images of War series from Pen & Sword Publishing, Tank Wrecks of the Eastern Front 1941–1945: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives (Images of War) by Anthony Tucker-Jones.

The Tanks of World War II – Episode 1: Polish TK-3 and TKS

In case anyone is wondering what we have been up to the last couple week, we have been busy planning and creating a new video series we call The Tanks of World War II.  Here is the first episode.  We are working on episode two as we type this.  It will feature (hopefully) better green screen keying, we are still working on the format and technical issues a bit.  Expect to see the next episode next Tuesday!

 

Series Description:

This series will be the first to document almost every model of tank that saw service in World War II in roughly chronological order.  We will start with the Polish campaign of 1939 and work our way through until we reach the end of the conflict in 1945, with a tentative schedule of 90 episodes.  The emphasis of each video will not only be a technical description of the tank, but more importantly, we will attempt to put the vehicle within its proper historical context.

We will try to explain how each tank came into being, looking at the various factors that went into its design and production.  Questions such as how did a countries particular military doctrine influence the design of the tank they decided to build?  How did their industrial capabilities, or perhaps more importantly, how did their industrial limitations affect the design?  And of course, what larger political and strategic demands affected the design, production and introduction of these tank designs?

We will evaluate these tanks as well, doing our best to present a nuanced judgement looking at a variety of criteria.  Of course, first and foremost is the combat history of the vehicle.  Did it perform on the battlefield as hoped for?  Also, we need to look at whether or not the vehicle fit the particular needs of the military force that it was issued to.  Was this design a technological dead end or did it provide a basis for future development?  And finally, was this particular tank design one that helped shape the outcome of the war, either in a positive or a negative way for its user?

These are the types of questions we hope to answer on The Tanks of World War II.  We think the story of these armored behemoths is a fascinating bit of history and we are excited to tell it.  If you find these machines as interesting as we do, then please, follow us as we embark on this journey through the The Tanks of the Second World War.

Video Book Review: Tanks of the USSR and International Tank Development

In this video we review two books by Alexander Ludeke, International Tank Development From 1970 (Fact File) and Tanks of the USSR 1917-1945 (Fact File).

Video Book Review: Tank Craft Series

We recently recieved copies of four different titles in the Tank Craft series.  Rather than review these all in one long video, we recorded an introduction video with some commentary about the series overall, followed by seperate videos for each book.  The titles covered in these are:

T-34: Russia’s Armoured Spearhead (Tank Craft)

Panzer IV: 1939-1945 (Tank Craft)

Panzer I & II: Blueprint for Blitzkrieg 1933–1941 (Tank Craft)

Jagdpanther Tank Destroyer: German Army and Waffen-SS, Western Europe 1944–1945 (Tank Craft)

 

 

 

 

Video: Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Cruiser Mk. II part 1

World of Tanks has posted a new video in the Inside the Hatch series featuring Nicholas “The Chieftain” Moran.  The new video looks at the British Cruiser Mk. II.

Book Alert: Armor Camouflage & Markings of the British Expeditionary Force, France 1939–1940

A new entry in the Armor Color Gallery series has been released, titled Armor Camouflage & Markings of the British Expeditionary Force, France 1939–1940: Part 1: 1st Army Tank Brigade (Armor Color Gallery) by Robert Gregory.  This is an 80 page softcover book.

Publisher’s description:

During the inter war period, the British army decided upon two tank designs: the Infantry Tank, which featured thick armor and slow speed to attack defensive positions, and the Cruiser Tank, with thin armor and fast speed to exploit any breakthrough. The Infantry Tank would equip an Army Tank Brigade and the Cruisers would equip the Armored Brigades. These designs were based on the theory that any new war would resemble the static warfare of 1914–1918.

Early in the 1940 campaign in France and Flanders, the British Expeditionary Force, along with the Belgian army and the best French divisions, were encircled north of the Somme. Futile attempts were made to break the encirclement. One such attempt was made by the 1st Army Tank Brigade, launched south of the town of Arras. The appearance of these Infantry Tanks stunned the German commander, who did not realize how few tanks there actually were, which caused the Germans to slow their advance, thus buying valuable time for the Dunkirk evacuation. The only British tanks north of the Somme that were capable of fighting other tanks were the Infantry Tanks of the 1st Army Tank Brigade. The Brigade had only two of its three Battalions and only one Battalion with its full complement of the larger A12.

Part 1 of Armor Camouflage & Markings of the British Expeditionary Force, France 1939–1940 examines the tanks of the 1st Army Tank Brigade. For security reasons, photography by British soldiers was strictly forbidden but encouraged on the German side. These after-the-battle photographs taken by German soldiers are valuable in examining what the tanks looked like during the 1940 campaign. Included are 157 b&w photographs and 26 full-color plates. Using war diaries, training pamphlets and other documents, the camouflage and markings of these armored vehicles are described. A brief description of the three types of tanks used, and the movements of the Brigade during the campaign are also covered. The photo captions point out the differences in the three types of A11, the modifications made specifically to the A12s and other information when known, such as the vehicle’s location and tank crew. The color plates depict the Light Tanks, the A11 and A12 Infantry Tanks, and show the camouflage and markings on several of each type. This book is the best-captioned reference to date, companioned with charts, rare unpublished photographs and color plates. It is a valuable resource for the armor enthusiast and military modeler.

Available from Amazon here.