Book Alert: Panzers East and West: The German 10th SS Panzer Division from the Eastern Front to Normandy

Those with an interest in WWII German Panzer units will be happy to know that a new book has been released from Stackpole on the history of the 10th Panzer Division.  Written by Dieter Stenger, Panzers East and West: The German 10th SS Panzer Division from the Eastern Front to Normandy is a 400 page hardcover volume.  According to the Stackpole website, Dieter Stenger is is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and has worked in the museum field for two decades, including stints at the Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum, the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, the National Museum of the Marine Corps, and the U.S. Army Center of Military History, where he is senior arms curator.  We haven’t had a chance to look at this book so that’s all we can really say about it.

Publisher’s Description:

Organized and trained during 1943, the 10th SS Panzer Division saw its first action in the spring of 1944 during the attempt to relieve an encircled German army on the Eastern Front. Several months later, Hitler ordered the 10th SS west to Normandy, where by mid-June 1944 German defenses against the Allied offensive were crumbling. Here the division engaged in a series of armored attacks and counterattacks against British and American forces. The 10th SS briefly held off a few enemy thrusts but gradually had to fall back to Falaise, where the division escaped the Allied encirclement with no tanks and only a fraction of its men. The 10th SS Panzer Division next defended against the Allied parachute assault during Operation Market Garden in September 1944. Depleted and now a division in name only, the 10th SS fought in Alsace before Hitler sent it to the Eastern Front again. There, east of Berlin, the division participated in the final, futile battles against the Red Army before escaping to Czechoslovakia to surrender to the U.S. Army.

Comments

  1. It would be amusing to know if he tried to hit up Gunter Grass for commentary!

    Like

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