From the Editor: War is Boring blog on Russian tank history

In the last couple weeks, a couple articles on Soviet tank history have appeared on the War is Boring blog.  One is a somewhat critical look at the WWII era KV tank while the other is a brief examination of post war Soviet heavy tank development.  By themselves, we didn’t really feel they merited posting about, but since they keep showing up in our daily searches for tank related articles, we did want to raise one point concerning them.

It seems both articles are based in part on an old ARMOR magazine article by Stephen “Cookie” Sewell titled Red Star – White Elephant.  As part of our “From the Vault” series of posts, we posted that particular article, as well as another ARMOR article by Sewell called Why Three Tanks?  in 2015.  Sewell is a well known figure in the AFV model building community, being the founder and first president of the Armor Modeling and Preservation Society.  He is also known for his model kit and book reviews which have appeared in Fine Scale Modeler magazine or online at the missing-lynx.com forum.

It is worth noting that Amazon has listed for release next summer a new book by Sewell on the Soviet T-10 Heavy Tank and Variants.  All we know about the book at this point is that it will be published by Osprey and will be a 144 page hardcover.

 

From the Vault: ARMOR article on Soviet Heavy Tanks

IS-3Today we present an article from the July-August 2002 issue of ARMOR magazine titled “Red Star – White Elephant?”  This article, written by Stephen “Cookie” Sewell, casts a critical eye on post WW2 Soviet heavy tank design, in particular the IS-3 and T-10.  Sewell notes that much of the information he is basing his conclusions on comes from research done after the collapse of the Soviet Union.  In the 1990s, access to the Soviet era archives opened up, allowing a new generation of Soviet armor authors to research and write.  Many of these names show up in the bibliography of this article, including Svirin, Baryatinskiy, and Kolomiets.  Unfortunately for western audiences, these Russian author’s works have not, for the most part,  been published in English.