Two new posts from “Below the Turret Ring” blog

Below the Turret Ring has made a couple of new posts.  As always, their posts provide a fairly lengthy description of some of the latest developments in AFV technology.  These two new posts look at the Austrian Pandur wheeled AFV and the Israeli “Carmel” next generation combat vehicle.  We have included an excerpt from the beginning of each post below.  Click on the headline to go to the Below the Turret Ring site and read the full article.

 

IDF Carmel details emerge

תמונה1A number of 3D graphics showing the Carmel next generation combat vehicle of the Israeli Defence Force, which sometimes is also called an advanced technology demonstrator, have been posted on the internet. The images come from a presentation held by the retired Brigadier General Didi Ben-Yoash, who formerly was the Chief Armored Corps Officer of the Israeli Defence Force (IDF). The presentation was part of the Second International Ground Warfare and Logistics Conference, held on 16th and 17th of May 2017 in the Latrun Armed Corps Memorial. Based on the fact that Didi Ben-Yoash is retied and IsraeliDefense.co.il describes this as a simulation of the Carmel, it appears extremely likely that the final vehicle might appear to be very different.

 

Austrian Pandur projects progression

Pandur-EvoThe Austrian company GDELS Steyr, part of the General Dynamics European Land Systems (GDELS) division and formerly known as Steyr-Daimler-Puch Spezialfahrzeug GmbH (SSF), is responsible for developing a new vehicle of the Pandur family of wheeled vehicles (FoV). A few photos of an unspecified Pandur 6×6 variant, which apparently is a long wheelbase version of the Pandur II, were taken at a recent event in April. The fact that the vehicle was presented in a modern digital camouflage pattern has caused some funny commencts regarding the lack of style; however here these photos were the inspiration to take a very short look at the Pandur 1 projects in Austria and other countries. The fact that a Pandur II 6×6 is located at the Steyr plant might be a hint regarding the development of the Pandur EVO – it could be used as reference or as base model for the next iteration of the Pandur vehicle. The Pandur 1 is operated in different versions by the Austrian Army (the so called Bundesheer), the Belgian Army (as scout and ambulance vehicles), the Kuwaiti National Guard (some armed with 25 mm autocannons or 90 mm Cockerill medium calibre guns), the Slovenian Army (known as locally as “Valuk”) and the US Army’s Special Forces (fitted with applique armor, operated by the Delta Force and 75th Rangers in very small numbers).

Wheeled AFVs becoming more popular in Middle East

Pandur-2Jane’s is reporting that wheeled armored fighting vehicles are becoming more popular in the Middle East, with a clear trend toward the fielding of larger fleets of 8×8 vehicles.  According to article author Christopher Foss, wheeled vehicles exhibit a number of significant advantages over their tracked counterparts, including lower procurement, operating and support costs, as well as having greater strategic mobility, especially over the longer distances that are encountered by a number of countries in the Gulf.  Vehicle types mentioned in the article include the Véhicule Blindé Léger (VBL) light scout car, Pandur 8×8, MOWAG Piranha, Centauro Mobile Gun System, and the Cadillac Gage Commando V-150.  Full article here.