Book Review: Hungarian Armored Forces of World War II

A video book review of Hungarian Armored Forces in World War II (Photosniper) by Peter Mujzer, published by Kagero as part of their Photosniper series.

Tanks of World War II – Episode 2: Panzerkampfwagen I

Here is the second video in our new series on the Tanks of World War II.  This one looks at the Panzer I.  This episode is a bit longer than the first one and includes more pictures.  We hope you all enjoy it.

If you would like to support this series, you can do so in a couple ways.  We have created a Patreon page for those that want to make a small regular donation.  Or, you can go to our page of recommended books on the Panzer I.  We get a small advertising fee if people shop on Amazon from the links on our site.

Video Book Review: Tank Craft Series

We recently recieved copies of four different titles in the Tank Craft series.  Rather than review these all in one long video, we recorded an introduction video with some commentary about the series overall, followed by seperate videos for each book.  The titles covered in these are:

T-34: Russia’s Armoured Spearhead (Tank Craft)

Panzer IV: 1939-1945 (Tank Craft)

Panzer I & II: Blueprint for Blitzkrieg 1933–1941 (Tank Craft)

Jagdpanther Tank Destroyer: German Army and Waffen-SS, Western Europe 1944–1945 (Tank Craft)

 

 

 

 

Book Alert: German Heavy Fighting Vehicles of the Second World War: From Tiger to E-100

Fonthill Media has released a new title by author Ken Estes titled German Heavy Fighting Vehicles of the Second World War: From Tiger to E-100.  This is a 180 page softcover book.

Publisher’s Description:

The German army faced tanks of superior size, armor and firepower from the outset of World War II. Although their Panzerwaffen handled the Polish campaign, war with France meant confronting superior heavy and medium tanks like the Char B and Somua, with 47 mm high velocity cannon that penetrated German tank armor with ease. French infantry disposed of effective antitank weapons and a portion of their 75 mm field guns were detailed as antitank guns. Even greater challenges emerged with the Russo-German War, for the Germans had no initial answer to the KV-1 heavy tank and T-34 medium.

The successive technical shocks of superior tanks introduced by each side produced a gun-armor race that continued in some manner even after the war’s end. The Germans placed a premium on technological quality and superiority over mass production, for which their industry (and, arguably, their regime) remained rather unsuited. Not satisfied with the advantage they obtained with the Tiger and Panther series tanks, the army leadership and Adolf Hitler himself pushed for larger and more powerful tanks than had ever been built.

Available from Amazon here.

General Barnes Tank Patent

Here is a short new video looking at an interesting tank patent we found from General Barnes, head of Ordnance during WWII.

 

ARDEC Report on 76MM Gun M1A1 and M1A2

76mm ammoFor those looking for a detailed report on the effectiveness of US 76mm tank guns, check out this new technical report from ARDEC, the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center.  Released in January of 2018, this document is a 58 page PDF and is a rather thorough examination of the topic.  Download the report here.

Report Abstract:

This report provides an analysis of the U.S. anti-tank technology during World War II. A ballistic analysis is used to corroborate the battlefield history and gain an understanding of the physical and technological factors that spurred the development of the M1 series 76-mm Gun and family of ammunition.

The technical manual (TM) 9-1907 was published 23 September 1944, but it was missing performance data for the 76-mm hyper-velocity, armor-piercing (HVAP) shell and any information for performance of the U.S. anti-tank capabilities against the German Panther tank. Battle history indicates there was a technological capability gap against upgraded Panzer armor. This report attempts to use hand calculations and modeling and
simulation (PRODAS) to fill in the information that is missing in TM 9-1907. The analysis offers the reader a greater engineering comprehension of the challenges faced between June 1944 and May 1945 and the circumstances necessitating the rapid fielding of the 76-mm HVAP shell after German capability upgrades were encountered in the European Theater of Operations from Normandy to the Battle of the Bulge (June to December 1944).

Tank Chats #47 King Tiger

Here is a new entry in the Tank Chat series from the Tank Museum at Bovington.  This one takes a look at the famous German WWII King Tiger tank.