Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Cruiser Mk. II part 2

Nick Moran of World of Tanks takes a look a the interior of the Cruiser Mk. II

Video Lecture: Design and History of the M4 Sherman Tank During World War II

World of Tanks researcher Nicholas Moran recently gave a lecture on the Design & History of the M4 Sherman Tank at the New York Military Affairs Symposium.  The entire presentation was recorded by C-Span.  The lecture is a little over an hour with a half hour Q&A at the end.  As can be expected from Nick Moran, its a quality lecture.  Some of the Q&A questions are a bit goofy (why is that guy bringing up Smedley Butler?), but that’s generally how these sorts of things go.

You can view the lecture at the C-Span website here or click on the image below.

Design andhistory of M4 Sherman

 

Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Char В1 Bis part 1

This one is pretty cool.  Nick “The Chieftain” Moran takes a look at the French Char B1 Bis.  This video is part 1, which looks at the exterior of the vehicle.

Inside the Hatch: Sherman VC “Firefly” part 1

Nicholas “The Chieftain” Moran of World of Tanks takes a look at a WWII era “Firefly” tank.

Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Stridsvagn 74

Here is part 1 & 2 of the “Inside the Hatch” video looking at the Stridsvagn 74 featuring Nicholas Moran of World of Tanks.


  

Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Panther. Part 2

In the second part of the legendary German Panther tour, Nicholas Moran talks about the features of the commander’s cupola and gunner’s position.

The Chieftain’s Hatch: Equipping the Force, Part 5

chieftains hatchNicholas “The Chieftain” Moran has posted the fifth part of his series of articles on the history of US tank development during WW2.  In the is post he compares and contrasts the difference in opinions between Army Ground Forces and Ordnance regarding tank development.

Excerpt:

Now that that salvo is over, let’s have a gander at the whole lot, and compare/contrast with Ordnance’s view of things.

It is interesting to compare the line just above, “The agency controlling the using arm should likewise control the actual development program”, with the position of General Barnes over at Ordnance: “For these reasons, it is necessary for the Ordnance Department to take a strong lead over the using services in the development of new equipment and then to get the help of those using services in determining where the weapon best fits into battlefield operations.”

Put simply, they are mutually exclusive propositions. In effect, you have the scientists saying “If we just let the using arms come up with the equipment needs, nothing ‘new’ or revolutionary would ever be developed”, and you have the using arms saying “Stop focusing on hypothetical wonderweapons, and put all your energy into this thing we know we need right now.”

Full article here.