Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Strv 103C part 2

In this second part of the Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch episode about the Strv 103 tank, Nicholas “The Chieftain” Moran looks at the crew positions, height restrictions, the number of people required to control the S-tank, and show the unique position of the radio operator/driver who faces backwards.

eBook Alert: T-34 and SU-152

World of Tanks has announced that the Russian language books on the T-34 and SU-152 put out by Tactical Press books a couple years ago are now available in English language ebook versions.  Hardcover versions of these books are planned, although not available yet.  For those wishing to purchase the ebook version, click here.

Publisher’s description:

2-booksThe World of Tanks series books are now available for the first time in English! They include never-before-seen photos, diagrams, and documents from Soviet archives—which is why we distinguish each volume as “The Russian View.”

In “The SU-152 and Related Vehicles,” you will learn about the design and evolution of the legendary self-propelled gun on the KV chassis, including many little-known prototypes and proposed alternate models. “The T-34 Goes to War” chronicles the real story of the celebrated medium tank, from its troubled conception to its first, desperate combat actions in the cauldron of Barbarossa. Both books are richly illustrated with photos, blueprints, and cutaway diagrams.

Comments on the series from Nicholas “The Chieftain” Moran:

Those of you around for a while will recall the release of the Tactical Press books in Russian a couple of years ago. Sadly, my enjoyment and the utility of my autographed copies has been limited somewhat by the minor detail that I don’t read any Russian, hence the idea that these books be translated into English, and I wholeheartedly approve.

The entire series covers vehicles that have already been addressed in English. However, these are based on the research of Russian authors who were able to take advantage of the more open Russian archives. Until now, we have been limited pretty much to the work of folks like Zaloga or Warford — well-regarded authors, but ultimately Americans at a distance from the source. I’ll guarantee that the information published hasn’t been available in English before now.

Video: Tanks 101

For those looking for an introductory video on “what is a tank”, Nick Moran from World of Tanks provides one in this new video.

Video: WoT -Object 279: the Warrior of the Apocalypse

Here is another video from the folks over at World of Tanks.  Featuring a number of Russian tank experts, this video looks at the rather unusual Soviet Object 279 heavy tank, one of which still survives on display at the Kubinka tank museum.  The one odd thing in the video it them giving the gun caliber in inches.  We’ve never before heard of a Soviet “5.1 inch gun” before, but we certainly have heard of a 130mm Soviet gun.  Anyhow, a small quibble regarding an otherwise interesting video.

Video: WoT – Kranvagn: A Swedish Experiment

Here is a video put out by Wargaming Europe on the relatively obscure Swedish Kranvagn tank.

Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Stridsvagn fm/21

World of Tanks researcher Nicholas Moran takes a look at the Swedish Stridsvagn fm/21 housed at the Arsenalen Museum.

The Chieftain’s Hatch: 100-Year Icon

Over at the World of Tanks site, tanker and researcher Nicholas Moran has posted his thoughts regarding the first 100 years of tank history.  It’s a good read, we have re-posted the start of the article below with a link to the full piece.

The Chieftain’s Hatch: 100-Year Icon

We’re now celebrating the second century of the tank, 100 years since the debut of tank combat in Flers-Courcelette (though the monument that marks the introduction of tank combat is in the nearby town of Pozières).

It’s no secret I’m kind of fond of tanks, and that I consider it quite fortunate that an object of my interest has also been my job, both in military and civilian service. But what has the tank actually become, and why is it so appealing, 100 years later?

Many moons ago, I picked up the book Tank by Patrick Wright, who took a slightly different tack than most folks in that he focused not so much on the technical or operational side of tanks, but instead more on the cultural and psychological aspects. The book received mediocre reviews because of this, but it’s worth reflecting upon its premise.

The tank is the symbol of land power. it’s usually the first image in one’s mind when thinking of modern battles. But it’s not the most important component of land power; that’s still the “poor bloody infantryman” (PBI) and his rifle. So, of all the various pieces that make up a modern army, why has the tank come out on top?

Read the full post here.