Tank Chats #22 Mark V Two Star

When the Germans realized what a threat tanks could be, they made their trenches wider to trap them; one answer to this was to build longer tanks and the Mark V was stretched by six feet to create the Mark V*. As an interim solution this was adequate but a further improved version, the Mark V** was designed for 1919.

Find out more about the First World War on the Tank Museum’s Centenary blog, Tank 100 http://www.tank100.com

Tank Chats #20 Mark IV

David Fletcher of the Bovington Tank Museum returns for another episode of “Tank Chats.”  This episode looks at the World War I era British Mark IV tank.

Tank Chats #19 Matilda II

From the Bovington Tank Museum:

The name Matilda means Strength in Battle from the Germanic roots Maht, meaning strong and Hild meaning battle.

The Matilda was regarded as a superb tank in its day and carved a remarkable career for itself. A few served in France in 1940 but in the early stages of the North African campaign, under General Wavell, it virtually ruled the desert. Even when the Afrika Korps arrived it remained a formidable opponent, immune to everything but the notorious 88mm gun. Its main failings were its slow speed and small gun, which could not be improved.

Tank Chats #18 Mark I

David Fletcher has returned to host the latest Tank Chat, on the Mark I tank.

The Museum’s Mark I is the only surviving example of this, the first tank produced to go into battle.

Tank Chats #16 Panther

Tank Chats #15 Tortoise

From the Tank Museum at Bovington comes another installment of the Tank Chats video series.  This episode is hosted by museum curator David Willey rather than regular host David Fletcher.

Tank Chats #14 Canal Defense Light

From the Tank Museum:

Mark II A12, Matilda Canal Defence Light (CDL)

Night fighting always presents problems but searchlights had been tested on tanks as early as 1919. The idea of turning them into an offensive weapon is credited to a Mr A V M Mitzakis, who devised his scheme before the war but the British authorities did not take it up until about 1940. The idea was to use a light of such power that it would dazzle the opposition, leaving them temporarily blind and disorientated.

Five British and two American battalions were trained on CDL and two of the British units went out to Egypt. In fact the CDL was never employed as intended. A few tanks were used to cover the Rhine Crossing and there were incidents in India after the war but that is all.

 

Tank Chats #13 Praying Mantis

From The Tank Museum at Bovington.

Number 13 in the series of David Fletcher’s Tank Chats, the Praying Mantis is an experimental machine-gun carrier manufactured in 1943.

Praying Mantis was designed by Mr E J Tapp of County Commercial Cars and the original patent dates from 1937. Two prototypes were built of which this is the second. The idea was to create a low profile weapon carrier which could take advantage of natural cover but raise itself up, as necessary, to shoot over walls or other obstacles.

Tank Chats #12 TOG II*

The Tank Museum has released another installment in the “Tank Chats” video series featuring David Fletcher.  This episode takes a look at the TOG II tank housed at Bovington Tank Museum.

Description:

This enormous tank was designed on the premise that World War II would evolve in the same way as the First World War. Some believed that existing tanks would not be able to deal with such conditions, and one of the most influential was Sir Albert Stern, who had been secretary to the Landships Committee in the First World War. In company with many others involved in tank design in 1916, including Sir William Tritton, Sir Eustace Tennyson D’Eyncourt, Sir Ernest Swinton and Walter Wilson, Stern was authorised by the War Office to design a heavy tank on First World War principles.

Two prototypes were built, both known as TOG for The Old Gang and they were even manufactured by the company that built Little Willie and the first tanks in 1916, William Foster & Co. of Lincoln.

Tank Chats #11 Valentine

The eleventh in a series of short films about some of the vehicles in the Bovington Tank Museum collection presented by historian David Fletcher MBE.

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