Video Editorial: Why I *Don’t* Hate World of Tanks

Many years ago I had written a piece for my previous blog called Why I Hate World of Tanks.  I decided to expound on that theme a bit more, softening my earlier stance.

Sentinel tank finds new home at Queensland museum

7271734-3x2-940x627ABC Far North (Australia) has posted an article about an AC1 Sentinel tank that has found a new home at the Australian Armour and Artillery Museum in Cairns.  Only 65 Sentinel tanks were produced by Australia during WW2 and only 3 of the AC1 still remain in existence (as well as 2 AC3 models, an AC4 and a few AC1 hulls converted into agricultural tractors.)  This particular Sentinel AC1 was owned by the late Jacques Littlefield as part of his large private collection.  The video game company Wargaming purchased the Littlefield Sentinel and has donated it to the Australian Armor & Artillery Museum where it will be put on display after some minor renovations.  The ABC Far North article quotes Wargaming America’s director of militaria relations Nicholas Moran:

“Australia had never built a proper tank before, so by the time the tank was ready for testing in July 1942 it was a little outdated.”

“By the time the fighting really got going against the Japanese, the Americans and British had started producing tanks of their own in large numbers and to a standard design.

“So it just simply didn’t make sense for Australia to continue to produce their own tank.”

The closest any Sentinel tank ever came to seeing actual military service was in the shooting of the film The Rats of Tobruk.

“If you see The Rats of Tobruk they’ve got German iron crosses on the side of them,” Mr Moran said.

“That was pretty typical of movies in the post-war industry; they didn’t really think the audience cared if a tank looked realistic, as long as it had a German cross on the side.

“In fairness, at least the Sentinel was unusual enough that it wasn’t going to be confused with something the Allies were using.”

For the full ABC article, click here.

Earlier this month Wargaming released a short video about this particular AC1 Sentinel.

 

For a list of the remaining Sentinel tanks in the world, click here to view a PDF of surviving Canadian and Australian Cruiser tanks hosted by the Surviving Panzers website.

Inside the tank: The M5 Stuart & M24 Chaffee

Wargaming Europe’s Richard Cutland takes a look at the M5 Stuart & M24 Chaffee.

Book Alert: Reprint of ‘Firepower” by Hunnicut is planned

Nicholas “The Chieftain” Moran has posted on his facebook account that his employer WarGaming is planning a World of Tanks reprint edition of the book “Firepower” by R. P.  Hunnicutt.  This book is long out of print and typically commands several hundred dollars for used copies in good condition.  Here is the post:

11755787_988543301185451_5192717826878223814_nOK, so we’re suffering from a bit of a dilemma. We’re hoping to release a WoT Edition of a book. Improved on the original a bit, we’ve sent them recent scans of photos from the archives, foreword and some addenda by myself, and so on.

The idea is that we do a single print run, and pass on the economy of scale to you guys. So, the more that are sold, the cheaper it is for everyone. (We also don’t care much about the book profit, so that’s a cost reduction too. The bottom line is that it’ll never be cheaper). Fine in theory. The catch: Usually these low-volume books are made ‘print-on-demand’, which may be a slightly lesser quality, is certainly more expensive in volume, but is decidedly faster.To do this right, highest quality printing, lowest cost, etc, has a long turnaround time from the printer. In theory, if we went by “Announce on Day 1. Close orders Day 30. Tally number of orders. Print that many”, it could take up to three months between when someone clicks “Checkout, take my credit card info” to when the book is shipped. I don’t understand the technology/process, that’s just what the publisher has told me. In effect, it’s a pre-order. For ease, we may go with a fixed price, and then add gold codes of a value to make up the difference.

The alternative is that we take a wild guess as to how many might be sold, order that many in advance, and hope not too many people get disappointed (and that we didn’t wildly over-estimate). Those X many people will get their books pretty much immediately. We have absolutely no idea how big a number “X” should be, we don’t really have a basis for comparison.

So, on the basis that we want to get the most people to benefit for the least cost, the question becomes “Just how patient are you guys? Are you willing to wait several months for this?” My personal opinion is that anyone who’s willing to pay dollars for this particular book is also willing to wait, but you never know, especially when our customers are used to clicking ‘purchase’ and having their goods deposited in their account within a few minutes.

Photo is prototype. Expect the final product to look a little different (Author’s name on spine, etc)

World of Tanks video on KV-1 recovery from Don river

Wargaming has released a Russian language video about the recovery of a KV-1 tank that was sitting in the Don river for 70 years.  Fortunately, English language subtitles are provided.

Inside the Tanks: The AMX 13 Part 1

Wargaming Europe has released a new installment of their “Inside the Tanks” video series.  This episode features series host “The Challenger” (Richard Cutland) examining a restored AMX-13 light tank belonging to collector Warwick Bolton.